superoeuvre
I feel personally sorrowful about black-white relations a lot of the time because black people have always been used as a buffer in this country between powers to prevent class war, to prevent other kinds of real conflagrations.
If there were no black people here in this country, it would have been Balkanized. The immigrants would have torn each other’s throats out, as they have done everywhere else. But in becoming an American, from Europe, what one has in common with that other immigrant is contempt for me — it’s nothing else but color. Wherever they were from, they would stand together. They could all say, ”I am not that.” So in that sense, becoming an American is based on an attitude: an exclusion of me.
It wasn’t negative to them — it was unifying. When they got off the boat, the second word they learned was ”nigger.” Ask them — I grew up with them. I remember in the fifth grade a smart little boy who had just arrived and didn’t speak any English. He sat next to me. I read well, and I taught him to read just by doing it. I remember the moment he found out that I was black — a nigger. It took him six months; he was told. And that’s the moment when he belonged, that was his entrance. Every immigrant knew he would not come as the very bottom. He had to come above at least one group — and that was us.
Toni Morrison, on bridging the abyss between sexes, classes, and races. (via howtobeterrell)
gender-and-science
classicethnichistoricalvibez:

President and Nuclear Physicist pf Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson, pictured here in 1973, was the first African American woman to earn a PhD in Nuclear Physics from MIT (same year as the image).  Mrs. Jackson is also known for holding office as former Chairman of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, appointed by President William Clinton

classicethnichistoricalvibez:

President and Nuclear Physicist pf Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson, pictured here in 1973, was the first African American woman to earn a PhD in Nuclear Physics from MIT (same year as the image).

Mrs. Jackson is also known for holding office as former Chairman of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, appointed by President William Clinton